May I Stare At You?

This is a research based blog into how staring works, spectacle, what is real, what different kinds of real can there be. Are you real? Really? Are you more real if you stare? Are you more real if people stare at you?

Have a Look!

A book trailer for the novel All The Broken Things by Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer, published in January 2014 from Random House of Canada.

"All The Broken Things is a strange, beautiful novel about the fundamental human need to be seen and to be loved. Bo is an unforgettable creation—a true survivor who carries within him both the poison of war and its antidote. His creator is a fearless writer: she considers the full spectrum of human nature—from the monstrous to the wondrous—with a clear gaze and a capacious heart." — Alissa York, author of Effigy and Fauna

Film by Carol Nguyen
Music by Arie van de Ven

Russell Brand interviewed by Marlena Katene. It struck me that this interview made both interviewer and interviewee more real. 

"Good boy!"

Of course, the fact that one’s body is never fully one’s own, bounded and self-referential, is the condition of passionate encounter, of desire, of longing, and of those modes of address and addressability upon which the feeling of aliveness depends.

—Judith Butler, in Frames of War

This is the best photo op of Rob Ford as mayor there is to see. Watch his discomfort. Watch how he eyes the bread, how he seeks his own comfort inside his discomfort. He sways in discomfort. He watches and does not understand. This is a primer for Rob Ford for Rosh Hashana but what an awkward primer it is.

Joe McIntosh’s film Viewfinder. I found it while searching information on one of my favourite pastimes when I was a kid. It was this crazy low tech portal into new worlds. I love this take on it.

Humans’ craving for both novelty and money lead to terrible things for other animals. Our proclivity to stare and apprehend has led historically to some of the most interesting spectacle at the expense of the evolution of our capacity for compassion.  

Humans’ craving for both novelty and money lead to terrible things for other animals. Our proclivity to stare and apprehend has led historically to some of the most interesting spectacle at the expense of the evolution of our capacity for compassion.  

In all the books and articles I have read on Freakshows and carnival (a lot by now), a distinction is made between those freaks who are born with novelty (giants, midgets, dwarves, and other oddities) and those who self create (the tattooed lady, the sword swallower, the contortionist and other oddities). This little girl is the offspring of Iraqi parents and (conjecturally) depleted uranium. She is a man-made freak, only she didn’t decide and neither did her parents. How can we look at this? What does it make us to have made this?

In all the books and articles I have read on Freakshows and carnival (a lot by now), a distinction is made between those freaks who are born with novelty (giants, midgets, dwarves, and other oddities) and those who self create (the tattooed lady, the sword swallower, the contortionist and other oddities). This little girl is the offspring of Iraqi parents and (conjecturally) depleted uranium. She is a man-made freak, only she didn’t decide and neither did her parents. How can we look at this? What does it make us to have made this?

Charles Stratton, famous Barnum actor, as Napoleon. Was he talented or was he a talented dwarf or was he just a dwarf? Why did people want to see him perform? Does it matter?

Charles Stratton, famous Barnum actor, as Napoleon. Was he talented or was he a talented dwarf or was he just a dwarf? Why did people want to see him perform? Does it matter?